Category Archives: summer

Advice for College Freshmen Part IV: 10 Things No One Tells You about College

10thigns

  1. Relationships are not easy: trying to date in college? Good luck with that. Finding the balance between school, fun and self-care is hard enough. Not saying it impossible to be in a thriving relationship in college, I’m just saying it’s not as easy as the movies make it seem.
  2. Your entire life revolves around school: I should rephrase….your entire life revolves around school, if you want to do well. You will have so much fun in college, but school is always in the back of your mind. You live on campus (or near campus), you plan your social calendar, meals and extra curriculars around classes and studying. School is a job and it will take up most of your time.
  3. You will learn every little thing about people you spend the most time with: I could probably name my roommates top 10 least favorite foods, the last 5 things she ordered from the internet and how much money she has in her bank account. Living with people and spending enormous amounts of time with them means learning a lot about them. This can bring you closer to someone, but be wary that it will also lead to annoyance and conflict; spending too much time with people makes them annoying sometimes. Just be patient and kind to people, always, it will pass.
  4. Not everyone will study as hard as you do: Take your education into your own hands and figure out how you need to do things to succeed. Just because your friend studies for two hours and then goes to a frat party the night before an exam doesn’t mean you should. On the other side of that, don’t study 10 hours if you’re prepared. Figure out how to find that sweet spot for preparedness (this comes with practice).
  5. College does not mean everyone is super smart: there is always that kid in class who asks too many questions about an assignment or asks a question that the professor just answered. It’s annoying, but it’s life.
  6. You’re not actually independent: Going to college is not an excuse to disconnect from your parents. Chances are they are paying for your education, food and housing. You’re still dependent on them, sorry.
  7. You will want to go home: People who tell you they have never once gotten homesick at school are full of shit crap. No way. No way. 99% of the time I’m homesick it’s not because I miss home per se, but because something happened at school and I just need to get away from that environment, but it’s still homesickness. When this happens, make plans to go home, a weekend away can do wonders. But don’t get in a habit of it.
  8. If you want to do well in school, you can’t party all the time: Going out once a week or so is totally normal and necessary for sanity, but if you go out every night you’ll be tired and hungover and will have wasted time you may need for work/studying. It will catch up with you.
  9. Partying really isn’t that fun: Yes, being with friends and meeting new people is fun, but partying can be hot and sweaty and creepy and end poorly to the point where you regret going in the first place. Don’t have expectations that are too high.
  10. Meal plans rock! People who complain about dining halls are stupid. Dining halls rock! AT my school there are always basics like sandwiches and salads along with a rotating menu. The key is to be creative! Mix and match pieces from different areas of the dining hall and you can make a kickass meal. My favorites? Rice with beans and lettuce and cheese from the salad bar, or get a tortilla from a sandwich station and shredded cheese from the salad bar and make a quesadilla on a Panini maker. The possibilities are endless. Watch what other people do and steal their ideas.

 

Do you have any advice for incoming college freshmen? Comment below and let me know!

june playlist

one of the first things you will learn about me is that i am a music addict. i love finding new music. i love delving into a new song and really reading the lyrics and melodies. so you’ll probably find a lot on here about music, including my 10 favorite songs from the previous month….enjoy.

  1. Photograph by Ed Sheeran (actually basically the entire ed sheeran cd, but i’m going to put my absolute favorite on here anyways).
  2. Tenerife Sea by Ed Sheeran (i mean….seriously…swoon)
  3. Even My Dad Does Sometimes by Ed Sheeran (okay, i’m done with my ed rant now)
  4. Bathroom Sink by Miranda Lambert
  5. XO by John Mayer (again….SWOON)
  6. Blaze by Colbie Caillat
  7. Take Me Home by Mikey Wax
  8. Leave the Night On by Sam Hunt
  9. American Kids by Kenny Chesney (IN LOVE WITH THIS SONG)
  10. Boom Clap by Charli XCX

 

“It’s alright to say that death’s the only thing you haven’t tried, but just for today hold on”

college girl’s guide to finding an internship

We have all been told that internships are an important part of our educational experience. They are a sort of rite of passage between student life and working life that can look great on a resume, but also provide incredible experiences and can be an important tool in figuring out what you want to do in the future. However, while internships can provide great means to establish connections, find mentors and collect skills in your field, they are not easily come by.

Finding the perfect internship can be stressful and confusing, but it is so important to find an internship that fits your personality, goals, educational interests and schedule. Make sure you consider your interests, qualifications and availability when looking for internships and consider some of these other tips as well:

  • Have an appropriate resume: you will not get any internship if you have a bad resume. Bad can mean several things: it is unprofessional, you have spelling errors, it looks like a child wrote it, it has the wrong information and so on. It is worth spending hours to make your resume acceptable to send to companies and businesses; your resume is the first thing a hiring manager will see and it will be all they have to make an initial judgment on (and that initial judgment is the difference between getting an email or interview and getting your resume thrown in the trash). People judge the person by the resume. Be very, very careful. That being said, here are some resources for creating a good resume:
      • Most colleges have a writing center or online resources to help students create resumes. They can help you sort through relevant information, format and edit your resume.
      • Use basic, simple, and easy to read texts. Don’t use fancy texts because they are “pretty” or “cute.” Just, no.
      • Also, don’t go color happy. It’s not professional. It doesn’t give off the right vibe. It makes your resume stand out for all of the wrong reasons.
      • That being said, you want your resume to stand out for the right reasons. Make it look nice. Make sure it is appealing to the eyes. Make sure it flows and looks good on paper and is easy to read and follow.
      • Be sure the information is right/relevant/important. Your resume should have your education (college and high school while you’re still in college, you don’t need you high school information if you’re graduated from college). Put relevant experience; clubs, groups, sports, extracurriculars.
      • Only include high school information if you are a freshman or sophomore in high school. After that, drop it and stick to more recent, relevant information. This includes jobs and awards.
      • Use action words. Stick with action-oriented words to describe your experiences and in job descriptions.
      • There is so much important information for writing resumes. If you’re making your resume all on your own, be sure to refer to various sources to find all the information about fonts, colors, information etc.
      • Some sources I like include this and this
  • Cover Letters: I hate cover letters. I hate cover letters. I really, really hate cover letters. In most cases I use the body of an email (with my resume attached) as a pseudo cover letter. My advice with cover letters is to have all of the important information, but be brief. People want to read a cover letter to know a little about you and why you’re interested, but they don’t want to be overbearing and boring (snoooooozeeeeee). There are several important pieces to a cover letter:
      • Your name, school, major, what you’re looking for etc: Basic important information about yourself and what you are looking for. What time frame are you looking for a job during? How much time are you willing to dedicate? All of that good stuff.
      • Where you found the job posting: there are a couple of aspects to this. Did you find it on a website? Say so. Are you just reaching out to a company to see if they have any positions? Say that. Just acknowledge where you are coming from.
      • What skills do you think you could bring? What relevant skills do you have? Read the posting specifically, are there any qualifications they specifically asked for that you should acknowledge? If so, do it.
      • Why are you interested? This is beyond “I need something to put on my resume.” Never, ever, ever write that. You should be interested because you want to gain skills and expand your education and learn from others and all of that jazz.
      • I always end my letters with something along the lines of “I look forward to hearing you soon.” Make it obvious that you are waiting for a response.
      • SAY THANK YOU: dear goodness, say thank you. Be polite. Thank them for their time and consideration. Have manners, people.
      • Give your contact information: email, linkedin, phone number etc.
      • Attach your resume (if in email): so many times I have been so close to sending a cover letter without a resume attached….so, so close.
  • Find somewhere to actually apply: by now you’re probably thinking “wow Kristin, this is great, but where the heck to I even find somewhere to apply?!?!” Fear not, young grasshopper. There are several places/ways to find internships to apply to.
      • Does your school have career services/websites/listservs? Get on that. A lot of times those postings are from people who are looking for students specifically from your school (because it rocks and you rock for going there) or from a specific major. Look out for that information and use those resources while you have them.
      • Internships.com: put in location, major, time period and any other relevant information. The site will produce lists and you can input more search options. Click on the listings and see if you qualify and you can send your resume and cover letter straight from the site.
      • Internmatch.com: *****same as above
      • Other websites such as craigslist and monster can be places to look as well.
      • Look into specific companies/places you are interested in working: if there are specific places you are interested in working for OR you just think it may be a good place to reach out, go ahead and send an email with your resume and cover letter. I have two internships this summer and I found both by sending emails out of the blue. It works people (cough especially if you’re willing to be unpaid cough…more on that later).
      • Use who you know: your aunts, uncles, parent’s friends, neighbor, the mom you used to babysit for. Use the connections that you have. Reach out to people and test the waters. Don’t hesitate to ask people for help if you think they have applicable information. But be smart, don’t ask someone who isn’t reliable or hates you or anything like that.
  • You honestly really need to be willing to work for free: it is really hard to find paid internships, but so many companies are willing to provide incredible opportunities for students who can work for free. Yeah, getting paid would be nice, but the experience is worth more than a minimum wage paycheck.
  • Always send a follow up email after an interview: Once you have your kick-ass resume, send a fabulous cover-letter, land that coveted interview and rock that as well, make sure you send a follow-up email to the people you interviewed with. Thank them for their time and information and express how interested you are in the job. This is lesson #1 I learned from my dad when applying for jobs and it definitely puts you ahead of any other candidates (and reminds them about you even after you’re gone).

Finding an internship can be crazy, hectic and (lets be honest) kind of scary, but so totally worth it when you score an amazing internship and get to spend your summer or semester learning crazy cool things about jobs you wish you had for real.

The opportunities are endless, go out and find them.

 

internship graphic

 

k